10th-11th
May

2022

Berlin,
Germany

#architecturenetwork

Venue

Frankfurt, Germany

Glinting with glass, steel and concrete skyscrapers, Frankfurt-on-the-Main (pronounced ‘mine’) is unlike any other German city. The focal point of a conurbation of 5.5 million inhabitants, ‘Mainhattan’ is a high-powered finance and business hub, home to one of the world’s largest stock exchanges and the gleaming headquarters of the European Central Bank, and famously hosts some of the world’s most important trade fairs, attracting thousands of business travellers

images (1)
images (4)

Yet at its heart, Frankfurt is an unexpectedly traditional and charming city, with half-timbered buildings huddled in its quaint medieval Altstadt (old town), cosy apple-wine taverns serving hearty regional food, village-like neighbourhoods filled with outdoor cafes, boutiques and street art, and beautiful parks, gardens and riverside paths. The city’s cache of museums is second in Germany only to Berlin’s, and its nightlife and entertainment scenes are bolstered by a spirited student population.

International trade fairs have been held in Frankfurt since 1240, and the city is now a leading commercial, financial, and high-technology centre. There is an important stock exchange (first established in 1585). The Rothschild family started building its international banking empire in Frankfurt. The city also is the home of the European Union’s central bank. Annual book, automobile, and computer fairs are popular events, and there are many other fairs held throughout the year. Manufactures include automobiles, machinery, chemical and pharmaceutical products, printing materials, and foodstuffs. The city is traditionally known for its production of high-quality sausages (frankfurters).

download
images (3)

Frankfurt has long been a key stopping point for river, rail, and road traffic from Switzerland and southern Germany northward along the Rhine River to the Ruhr region and across the Main River to north-central Germany. It is still the chief traffic hub for western Germany and has also been an important inland shipping port since the canalization of the Main in the 1880s. Frankfurt Airport is the largest airport in Germany and one of the busiest in Europe.

Culture and Events

  • … Berlin is one of the few cities that has three UNESCO World Heritage sites. In addition to the famous Museum Island and the Prussian palaces and gardens, the Berlin Modernist housing estates are also among them. Furthermore, the German capital has also been bestowed the title of UNESCO City of Design and is thus included in the UNESCO Creative Cities Network.
  • … Berlin is the only city in the world that has three opera houses holding performances. The Deutsche Oper, the Staatsoper Unter den Linden and the Komische Oper offer more than 4,400 seats to their audiences. Berlin also has more than 150 theatres and live show stages catering to all genres.
  • … Berlin is the only European city that has more museums than rainy days.On average there are 99 rainy days a year, and there are around 175 museums.
  • … the Gemäldegalerie (portrait gallery) at the Kulturforum, which opened in 1998, unites the collections of the Bode Museum (in the former East) and the Gemäldegalerie in Dahlem (in the former West) that were separated when the city was divided.
  • … Berlin with its roughly 300 galleries for classical modernism and contemporary art has the largest gallery scene in Europe. 
berlin 1 pic
  • . … the world’s largest universal museum is being built on the Museum Island in the centre of Berlin.The Old National Gallery, the Bode Museum, the Old Museum and the New Museum with the world-famous bust of Nefertiti have already been renovated. The new James Simon Galerie connects four of the five buildings on the Museum Island. The north wing and the central section of the Pergamon museum are currently being modernised. Work is scheduled to be completed in 2023, after which the south wing will be renovated and the museum will be given a new fourth wing connecting the north and south wings.
  • … the Jewish Museum has attracted around 12.1 million visitors annually to its exhibitions since opening on 13 September 2001? The building was designed by Daniel Libeskind and its shape is reminiscent of a destroyed Star of David. It is one of the most important examples of contemporary architecture.
  • … in addition to the world famous collections, Berlin also has more unusual museums such as the Lippenstift Museum (lipstick museum), the Schwules Museum (gay museum), the Hanf Museum (hemp museum) and Urban Nation, the museum for urban contemporary art.
  • … the largest Chinese garden in Europe is situated in Berlin. It is part of Marzahn’s leisure park and has an ensemble of ten ‘gardens of the world’. Visitors can take part in a tea ceremony in the Japanese garden. There are also Balinese, Korean and Middle Eastern gardens as well as an Italian Renaissance garden, shrub garden, Christian garden, English landscape garden and a maze. The 11th large theme garden is currently being created with a Jewish Garden. The opening is planned for 2021.
  • … Berlin’s landmarks – such as the TV tower, the Brandenburg Gate, the Berlin Cathedral, the Victory Column and many other buildings – appear in a completely different light once a year? At the annual Berlin Illuminated and Festival of Lights events held in October, they are transformed into huge projection surfaces for original light installations. And how could it be otherwise: both events are of course among the largest light festivals in the world.
  • … the Berlinale, one of the most popular film festivals in Europe, will already be 71 years old in 2021. As one of the top media events for the film industry, it attracts over 21,000 industry visitors and journalists from almost 130 countries each year. Berlin distinguishes itself from other film festivals by the large participation of the general public. Some 100,000 film lovers from Germany and abroad purchased 330,000 cinema tickets in 2020 (this does not include industry visitors).

 

berlin 2

Life in Berlin

 ●… the city had its highest number of residents in 1942. At that time 4,478,102 people lived in Berlin. Today there are more than 3.7 million.

●… for the 2019/20 winter semester a total of around 193,000 students are enrolled at the four universities, four universities of applied sciences and 30 private higher education institutions in Berlin.

●… Berlin is the most multicultural city in Germany. Of the approximately 3.7 million residents, 812,705 possess a foreign passport. People from 190 countries live in the city, of them around 71,000 are Polish and 106,000 are Turkish citizens.

●… there are more than 100 vegan or vegan-friendly restaurants in Berlin.Exclusively animal-free products and foods are also available in cafés, ice cream parlours supermarkets, butchers and even a vegan sex shop.

●… the Berlin dialect was particularly influenced by the Huguenots from the late 17th century. Some words have French origins: Budike (pub or shop), Boulette (meatball), Roulade (rolled cuts of meat) and Destille (pub). But other linguistic influences have left audible traces, such as from Hebrew (via Yiddish), in expressions such as Malochen (hard work), Schlamassel (misfortune) and Moos (money).

●… Berliners are devoted dog lovers. More than 107,700 dogs were registered in the city at the end of 2018. .  

More Fun Facts

  • … the longest street in the city is the Adlergestell which stretches 11.9 kilometres from Adlershof to Schmöckwitz. And the shortest lane is the Eiergasse in the Nikolai quarter, which is only 16 metres long. The widest is not Breite Straße as the name ‘wide street’ suggests, but rather Straße des 17. Juni, which is 85.2 metres wide.
  • … in the olden days, Berlin already ended at the Brandenburg Gate.The historical city border can still be recognised in the street names, such as Wallstraße, Mauerstraße, Linienstraße and Palisadenstraße. The former city gates are now predominantly preserved in the form of underground station names – Schlesisches, Kottbusser, Hallesches and Oranienburger Tor.
  • … Berlin’s second highest elevation, the 120 metre-high Teufelsberg, consists of rubble. After the war, 26 million cubic metres of rubble were heaped here.
  • … Berlin has the approximately the same width of London and the same length of Naples in Italy.
  • … nine American presidents have visited Berlin since WWII? John F. Kennedy’s utterance “Ich bin ein Berliner” (“I am a Berliner”, 1963) and Ronald Reagan’s emphatic exclamation “Mr Gorbachev, tear down this wall!” (1987) are unforgettable.
  • … visitors from West Berlin had to change at least 25 Deutsche Marks per day into East German Marks at an exchange rate of 1:1 when they visited the Eastern part of the city during the era of the Berlin Wall. Money not spent could not be exchanged back again. It could however be deposited at the border branch of the GDR state bank and withdrawn at the next visit. A visa cost five Deutsche Marks for tourists from West Germany, for West Berliners it was free of charge.
  • …the first traffic lights in Europe were put into operation at Potsdamer Platz in 1924. A replica of the traffic light tower can still be admired there today. 
  • … with an area of 892 square kilometres Berlin is almost nine times larger than Paris.
  • … four Germans set a Guinness World Record in November 2014. They travelled to all 173 Berlin underground stations in just 7 hours, 33 minutes and 15 seconds.
berlin 2
  • . … the world’s largest universal museum is being built on the Museum Island in the centre of Berlin.The Old National Gallery, the Bode Museum, the Old Museum and the New Museum with the world-famous bust of Nefertiti have already been renovated. The new James Simon Galerie connects four of the five buildings on the Museum Island. The north wing and the central section of the Pergamon museum are currently being modernised. Work is scheduled to be completed in 2023, after which the south wing will be renovated and the museum will be given a new fourth wing connecting the north and south wings.
  • … the Jewish Museum has attracted around 12.1 million visitors annually to its exhibitions since opening on 13 September 2001? The building was designed by Daniel Libeskind and its shape is reminiscent of a destroyed Star of David. It is one of the most important examples of contemporary architecture.
  • … in addition to the world famous collections, Berlin also has more unusual museums such as the Lippenstift Museum (lipstick museum), the Schwules Museum (gay museum), the Hanf Museum (hemp museum) and Urban Nation, the museum for urban contemporary art.
  • … the largest Chinese garden in Europe is situated in Berlin. It is part of Marzahn’s leisure park and has an ensemble of ten ‘gardens of the world’. Visitors can take part in a tea ceremony in the Japanese garden. There are also Balinese, Korean and Middle Eastern gardens as well as an Italian Renaissance garden, shrub garden, Christian garden, English landscape garden and a maze. The 11th large theme garden is currently being created with a Jewish Garden. The opening is planned for 2021.
  • … Berlin’s landmarks – such as the TV tower, the Brandenburg Gate, the Berlin Cathedral, the Victory Column and many other buildings – appear in a completely different light once a year? At the annual Berlin Illuminated and Festival of Lights events held in October, they are transformed into huge projection surfaces for original light installations. And how could it be otherwise: both events are of course among the largest light festivals in the world.
  • … the Berlinale, one of the most popular film festivals in Europe, will already be 71 years old in 2021. As one of the top media events for the film industry, it attracts over 21,000 industry visitors and journalists from almost 130 countries each year. Berlin distinguishes itself from other film festivals by the large participation of the general public. Some 100,000 film lovers from Germany and abroad purchased 330,000 cinema tickets in 2020 (this does not include industry visitors).

 

SUBSCRIBE TO WEEKELY UPDATES AND NEWSLETTER

Cosentino

The Cosentino Group is a family company from Spain that operates worldwide, producing and distributing high-quality and innovative surfaces for the world of design and architecture. In close cooperation with clients and partners, design solutions of high value are created that are an inspiration in the lives of many people. This goal is possible thanks to pioneering and top brands in their respective segments such as Silestone®, Dekton® or Sensa by Cosentino® – technologically advanced surfaces that enable the creation of unique environments and designs for private and public spaces. www.cosentino.com

Statement:

“It’s an honour for Cosentino to be part of the Architecture & Design Network! We are looking forward to getting in touch with the relevant decision makers of the branch to identify new business opportunities and

get you inspired with our design solutions. As a producer of high-quality and innovative, sustainable surfaces for the world of design and architecture, we always aim to enable the creation of unique environments and designs for private and public spaces.“ Hendrik Willems [Regional Director BeNeLux & Germany]